Wednesday, 16 November 2011

Making your own fabric labels tutorial

I wanted to create my own fabric label for a long time. But I couldn't find a best way to print my own label. I read a lot of tutorials from different websites but still do not give me a good result. Therefore, I have done some experiments by using three different methods.

Method 1: Using Vinegar

- I ironed the fabric on a piece of freezer paper.
- Printed my design on the fabric.
- Let it dried for 5 minutes. Then, peeled the paper off the fabric.
- Ironed the fabric and let it set.
- Rinsed fabric in a pan of white vinegar , yes it's VINEGAR for 1 minute.
.
- Laid flat on a towel and blowed dry the it.

Result:

It turned out like this......




Pros- This is a healthy way of creating your fabric label as I didn't touch any of the chemical stuff to make the prints set on the fabric. In another word, this is an Organic Way of printing your own fabric label!

Cons- I don't think it looks great though!

Right, let's move on to the 2nd method!


Method 2: Using Bubble Jet Set



- Poured the solution into a flat pan and saturated fabric in solution for 5 minutes.
- Dried the fabric.
- Ironed the fabric on a piece of freezer paper.
- Printed my design on the fabric.
- Let the fabric sit for 30 minutes.
- Hand washed the fabric in cold water.
-Laid flat on a towel and blowed dry the it.

Result:

.... not too bad. I like it!
Can you see the difference?
Pros- The result was so GOOD!

Cons- Poisoning way of creating your fabric label! Do you know why? This solution contains Formaldehyde, commonly called formalin. Do you know what is that for? It is used to
"Formaldehyde is highly toxic to humans, regardless of method of intake. Ingestion of as little as 30 mL (1 oz.) of a solution containing 37% formaldehyde has been reported to cause death in an adult. " From Wikipedia.

This bubble jet solution contains a very small amount of formaldehyde at a concentration of 0.001%. I think it is safe enough to use as long as you keep it away from children.



Method 3: Using Miracle Fabric Sheets


Here is the tute:

Step 1:
Create an image or photograph using your computer, digital camera or scanner.

Tips: Print your design on paper first before print on the fabric. Check and align it well before you print it.


Step 2:
Print fabric sheets in your printer tray and print design on the fabric side.


Step 3:
Remove paper backing from fabric sheet.


Step 4:
Iron on the unprinted side of fabric to heat set the image.
Tips: Do not use steam!


Step 5:
Rinse fabric sheet in a pan of cold water for 1 minute.


Step 6:
Lay flat on a towel and allow to air dry or blow dry.


Tada! Here you go ... I have created my own fabric labels with a superb result!

There are many ways of making your own fabric labels. Choose a suitable one and experiment it! Please don't forget to leave a comment! Thank you!


38 comments:

  1. Whoa - I like the 2nd one but yeah...the formaldehyde kind of creeps me out I can't lie! I have the fabric printer sheets but haven't used them yet...I keep avoiding it for some reason. What I would really LOVE is to create some Spoonflower labels. (Hoping Santa will give me some $$ to make that happen!) Thanks for the tips, this was a great review!

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    1. thank you so much for the tutorial.. It is what I have been lookin for. #3 is my pick too. Thank you again Audrey Tareco

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  2. Thanks for the compliments Rebecca! Yeah, I like Spoonflower labels as well.

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  3. OK, from 13:00 today until 13:00 tomorrow, Spoonflower has free shipping, including internationally!!! So if you're gonna order from them, go now! You can get about 20 3.5" square (finished) labels for less than $10!!! (choose the Fat Quarter option after creating the smallest labels possible)
    see my post: http://sewhappygeek.co.uk/index.php/2011/07/07/spoonflower-quilt-labels-wanna-join-the-fun/
    Here's the link to the free templates: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jaybirdquilts/5832820094/
    Just make sure you download the ORIGINAL size! (click on picture, click see all sizes in upper right corner, click Original 1200 x 1200)

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  4. Thanks Jenna! I will check that out!

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  5. Hello Janet! wow, your blog is amazing - I read Jodi from Pleasant Home's blog this morning before going to work and she had featured your site! So I came over to visit - so glad that I did.

    Have a wonderful week, and I will be back often to see all of your beautiful work.

    Darlene Barnes Rosner

    barnes-girl.blogspot.com

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  6. It's lovely to meet you Janet and see your beautiful blog (I can almost hear you singing!). I also found your blog via Jodi from Pleasant Home and so glad I did :)

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  7. Hi I am new to your blog and glad to be here...I like #3 also. I think it is the best result...

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  8. I have read about how this was done so many years ago and have been reluctant to try it. I'm printing your blog and going to give it a whirl. Thank you for putting this out there. I sure appreciate the help. Carolyn

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  9. I've made my faux bubble jet set using the recipe found here: http://rebecca-gatheryeroses.blogspot.com/2010/01/how-to-make-your-own-faux-bubble.html

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  10. Have you applied these labels to clothes yet to see if any of them are easier to work with? Have you seen yet how they do after a few laundry cycles? Many thanks for the great pictures and comparisons.

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  11. Hello Janet, thanks for the sharing. I almost give up to keep on trying making my own fabric label. But after read your entry I think I should try the 3rd method. Would you suggest me where can I bought those miracle fabric? or do you have it for sale? TQVM

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  12. I am not Janet but I did see 8-1/2x11 fabric sheets to print on in JoAnn's fabric store. It is with quilting notions and today there was 50% off. I have not tried any of the methods above or printing fabric but I will. I also saw a hot iron transfer book in the quilting books that has labels to iron on fabric. Has anyone tried those? Thanks for the tutorials above.

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    1. Awsome! I can't wait to try this.
      Thank you!!

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    2. The sheets that are at Joanns are not washable. Be very aware of that, they are to be dry cleaned. Go to cjenkinscompany.com. Their sheets are already treated with the Bubble Jet Set you just have to use the Bubble Rinse to make them permanent. I have printed pictures with this method and they came out really nice.

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  13. Janet, Thanks for the wonderful tutorials for Printing my own labels. Takes all the guess work out of the process, plus saves money and time. Love it! Josi

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  14. Hi Janet...I've tried the freezer paper method before (found it on another site), but didn't know about the vinegar rinse. The paper didn't go through my printer right, kept catching and almost ruined my printer. I think I may have used cloth that was too thin and the printer couldn't get it to feed right. But I'm not giving up! I've also used the sheets made for printers (your #3). They work great! I've made baby books, appliques for aprons and purses, and other things using that method. Gonna bookmark this page. Thanks for the tutorial.

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  15. Really useful tutorial! Thank you very much!

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  16. I'm just getting started at this kind of thing, so your tutorial was eye-opening. I loved the 3rd method so I might try that one. However, I live in a small town in the middle of the ocean and I can't imagine having some of these supplies, but at least now I know where to start. Mahalo!

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  17. What kind of fabric goes through an inkjet printer? I am always looking for new ways to create my own items...I am new to sewing...but I like the idea of having my own fabric labels. Thanks for the ideas and showing pictures of each one. Much appreciated. Take care and have a great day.

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  18. thank you for the great tips on how to make our own labels. i feel conident following your directions that i could use any of the three processes to make labels. like you i have tried other directions and did not get the results i felt meet my needs plus they were hard to understand and often lead to failed results. please keep up the great work, again thank you for sharing with the rest of us.

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  19. THANK you so much!!! I have been trying also to find one I liked, but did not want to spend alot of money trying different ways....I love how you showed several ways with the outcomes. Keep up the great work!

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  20. Thank you so much for the information - I don't think that my printer would handle fabric sheets, so I just might use iron on transfers instead. Thanks again for your generosity!

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  21. Speaking of printing on fabric, once the fabric has been treated, dried and ironed flat I use sticky labels the ones the have one label to an A4 sheet. Press them down evenly with no bubbles and trim the edges level to label with sharp scissors. Then print! The label peels off easily afterwards and doesn't leave a sticky residue. So far I haven't had one snag in the printer either. I'm in the UK and its difficult to get freezer paper here, usually only in specialist quilting shops and its expensive so this is ideal for me.

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  22. Hehe! The one with the formaldehyde kind of scared me too! But as you said, the bubble jet solution only contains very little, so I guess it’s okay to use it. But, I’ll go with the third method because it looks easier and I like the result of that much better. Anyway, thanks for the detailed steps! =)

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  23. Interesting I tried bubble jet but couldn't get on with it. I had fair results ironing 2 layers of freezer paper on fabric then put through my printer. I then iron it and it seems to set it?? It's works for me lol

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  24. I like this tutorial, but I have a question. When you cut your labels how do you prevent the edges from fraying?

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  25. I love that you provided three options for custom labels and did it very well. I've got to say, I've used the fabric sheets before and I found that the printing on them fade with even gentle washing. And I don't like that the fabric frays and needs all sides finished or hemmed. I came up with my own solution that requires minimal sewing. The free tute for my "easy fabric labels" is on my website in my Painted Projects category.

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    1. I just started to make some clothing for toddlers and I am trying to sell it on Etsy.com. I am just a beginner, and I think what would be nice to add labels to my creations. I would like to know your website to learn about easy fabric labels.
      Thank you very much. From Etsy.com/shop/kutethings

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  26. I like that you have three ideas to try. The only problem working with someone that has an TBI and searching for a really simple and easiest way that could be understood by this person alone is hard to find. Wish there was a way that your words and ideas could be put into a more simple way for people with a disability. Other than that I think your site is GREAT!!

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  27. Would it work as well if you were to use one sideed sizing sheets. Just print it on the sizing once cut into the proper deminsions for your printer.Print it backwards on the iron side. Then just press it with a hot iron. I'll have to try it out and get back with the results.

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  28. thanks for your information nada 18 march 2013

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  29. I have tried many ways.I'll stick to the Bubble jet way. I set yards of fabric to have on hand when needed. I had terrible luck with Freezer paper the printer feed chewed it off the cloth.I found using thin interfacing worked much better and could be pulled off after and reused many times. I taught teens, it worked very well. we used current pictures, current signature, and date. true memory quilts.

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  30. I buy printable fabric sheets. I set up my label info in excel. once you have it looking the way you want you can print it out on a sheet of this printable fabric. When you cut your labels to size they easily iron on. For my bags and totes this works really well and washing these items does not seem to effect the label. May be a bit stiff for a fine garment.

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  31. I usually just make my fabric labels on my embroidery machine set on the smallest font. They come out great and I can sew them on immediately without having to wait for them to dry. I know not everyone has been blessed with an embroidery machine, but it works for me.

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    1. Until I read your comment the thought of embroidering my labels never crossed my mind. Could it be because I'm a new machine owner? LOL Thanks for the tip. :)

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  32. I have a laser printer not an inkjet. Any idea if I can use that? I did use some of the printer sheets with my fingers crossed and they printed but I don't dare wash them. Maybe I will set them with vinegar first.

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